Engineered Hardwood

Engineered Hardwood

Why Engineered Hardwood Floors?

We can’t can deny the beauty of a hardwood floor. It has a long history of luxury, and a timeless beauty. It is also expensive and not easy to install, not to mention the costly maintenance. Those looking for a wood look but are looking for a better deal should consider engineered hardwood flooring.

Unlike conventional hardwood, which consists completely of wood, engineered hardwood is a different product that consists of several layers. The outermost is a hardwood veneer, a thin slice of wood (less than 1/8″) of whatever species you desire. The inner layers are made of plywood, high density fiberboard, or hardwood. The core layers make the product more stable than regular hardwood and more resistant to moisture variations.

Engineered hardwood is different than a laminate flooring because the surface is made of real wood. While laminate has a core of high density fiberboard, its surface is basically a thin layer picture. Laminate is less expensive than engineered and solid hardwood but it has its uses.

The benefits of using engineered wood floors

Include more resistance to slightly lower and higher moisture levels than solid wood flooring, which adds to their appeal to use in damp basements or in regions of the country that have higher or lower than normal relative humidity levels. Also, engineered flooring (excluding the newer Click Lock flooring) can be direct glued-down over (dry) concrete slabs above or below grade or stapled down over a wood subfloor.

Click engineered flooring is becoming a more and more popular in the engineered market. Click engineered boards have special tongue and groove systems that simply lock together, forming a tight seam and a seamlessly smooth appearance. Click  floating engineered floors require absolutely no glue during installation and just lay over a foam or cork underlayment. Click locking engineered floors can be installed on any grade level in the home and not only over traditional plywood or concrete subfloors, but also over old hardwood flooring, vinyl and tile as long as they are flat and well secured.

 

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